Wednesday, July 13, 2011

You MUST read this!

I love critique partners. Mine, Bonnie Paulson, is amazing and her feedback is always encouraging and helpful. She keeps me on track with writing goals.

I have also done crits with other LDS authors (Kaylee and Melanie) who have done SO much to help improve my novels, and for those I am incredibly grateful. Beta readers are another tool I ALWAYS use before submitting a book.

HOWEVER, I also feel there are times when critiquing can be stifling to a writer's creativity.

I recently read this post called Death By Critique, and the author hit the nail on the head for me.

Read it and then hop on back here and tell me what you think.

Have you ever felt a Death By Critique on a novel? Do you feel critiques ever do more harm than good to a writer's creativity?

5 comments:

Bonnie R. Paulson said...

This blog was exactly what I needed too.

I, of course, overly uberly adore my CP. SHe's ULTRA awesome and fun and challenges the crud out of me.

I agree that work can be overedited but how do you know when you've hit too much or not enough?

I recently read the first two books in a YA paranormal series by Kathryn Stockett - Finding Bodies. And i was critiquing the writing until I realized that her voice was awesome. Then I didn't care about the ly words coming out of the page like dust on my shelves. Seriously, great voice and overediting might have killed it.

Roni Loren said...

Thanks so much for linking to my post! Glad you found the post helpful! :)

Jessica R. Patch said...

She had a lot of meat to chew on!

"Write your rough draft without input from others."

I especially agree with this. I've been in groups where we crit chapters as they come and it's hard to pick out voice and breaking rules on purpose than it is when I read an entire ms for someone.

I always write my first draft, and second alone. Once I write, fix problems I see, line edit--then I send it.

Thanks for the link. She had lots of good things to say!

Emily Rittel-King said...

So my writing is raw and a literary agent wants to chew on it? AWESOME! That's totally what I needed to hear today because I hate my book right now. I want it to die in a fire. The reason? My voice! I hate it! It's kind of like listening to yourself on video or on the answering machine. I cringe every time. Right now, I'm cringing at my manuscript. Again, thanks for reminding me that my voice is me. I think I'll stick with it.

Kaylee Baldwin said...

I completely agree. I think that the major problem comes when you have people critique while still writing the ms. I took mine to critique group while only 20K in, and it kind of killed the muse. I'm forcing myself back on it right now (I think I can push through to a good place if I just sit down and write). I think the important thing for critiquers is to leave the voice alone and focus on plot, weak points in the narrative, awkward phrasing (or pointing out passages that "just didn't do it" for them, common grammatical errors that need to be looked at, and just general feelings (like if the voice sounds authentic or not). With so many similar plots always circling and being recycled, voice is really what makes a ms stand out.

Oh, and I liked critiquing with you, too. Thanks :)